Edited volume

Wojciech Jasiakiewicz, Jakub Lipski (eds.) (2015)

John Bull and the Continent

Publishing house Peter Lang Verlag
Place of publication Frankfurt am Main et.al.
Page references 226
Series English Literature and Culture in Context
Language English

ISBN: 978-3-631-65320-3

Ever since John Arbuthnot published The History of John Bull in 1712, the figure of John Bull has stereotypically personified the best and the worst traits of the British (or English) national character. The present work takes the eponymous juxtaposition as an incentive to study the variety of multi-faceted contacts between the two sides. Given the recent attempts at a re-definition of the relationship between Britain and the Continent – best visible in the turmoil over Britain's EU membership – the results of the research will hopefully stimulate discussion about John Bull's ever-changing presence within or without the Continent.

Contents:

Wojciech Jasiakiewicz: Henry VIII and the Polish question – Małgorzata Rutkowska: «Strangely unknown in England»: Poland in nineteenth-and early twentieth-century British travel accounts – Magdalena Ożarska: Austenian inspirations for Maria Wirtemberska's «Original Romance»: Malvina, or the Heart's Intuition (1816) – Miłosz K. Cybowski: First and last refuge: France and Britain as centres of the Polish Great Emigration – Michał Borodo: Billy and Casp: Rediscovering forgotten translations in Polish-English cultural exchanges – Tomasz Niedokos: Close encounters with John Bull: Polish narratives of disappointment with England – Douglas Root: Samuel Johnson and Voltaire's «Petty Cavils» on English literature – Krystyna Urbisz Golkowska: Identity renegotiation in Charlote Brontë's Villette – Dariusz Pestka: The influence of continental symbolism, impressionism and post-impressionism on British writers and painters – Adam Aleksandrowicz: Crossing the Channel with Julian Barnes: A brief (hi)story of fulfilment, misapprehension and disillusionment – Maciej Wieczorek: Living through the benign nightmares? (Re)contextualising in-yer-face theatre – Stephen Dewsbury: Two world wars and one World Cup: Attitudes and expressions to «the Continent» in John King's England Away – Jakub Lipski: Radcliffe's capricci: The prisons of the Inquisition in The Italian – Daniel Evers: «My heart is sore / For my own land's sins»: Elizabeth Barrett Browning's relationship with Italy.

(From the publisher's website)